The Thing About Humans

Humans are silly, fickle creatures. They are never quite content with what they have. Unlike their jollier cousins, the Hobbits, they are obsessed with being busy. Heaven forbid they actually enjoy free time. And I do mean free time. Time that is unpaid and unscheduled.

Some two hundred years ago, humans worked from sunrise to sunset. They worked hard, and enjoyed the fruit of those labors. But they were tired. And so some humans called “scientists” or “inventors” began thinking of ways to make life easier. Over the years they made machines to help with plowing, printing, cooking, cleaning, traveling, and even communicating. One could look back on these marvelous inventions and assume that humans now had oodles of free time. Well, you know what they say about assuming things…

Sadly, just the opposite was true. They were busier than ever! Now that machines could do much of the work humans used to do, people were now “free” to work more, clean more, organize more…you get the idea.

Even food–a simple, essential pleasure for the Hobbits–became a chore and a curse. Eat too much and be condemned for the weighty aftermath; eat too little and be accused of superiority or mental disease. Then there was even a time when people were culture-pressured to purchase, or grow, only special produce, cook it in a way that still rendered health benefits, and looked like a baby rabbit. Others gave up completely and let other prepare “food” for them because they were too busy to do it themselves.

Surely, you say, they must have been content with finances since they worked so hard for it. Au contraire, my good friend! As each one’s wages grew, the needs also swelled, usually far beyond the wage earned. And so many–too many–became dependent upon their leaders to support their lifestyles. Of course, many of the leaders lined their own pockets as leaders are wont to do.

What became of these sad, sad creatures? The majority continued in this way of self-destruction, while others returned to the ways of their ancestors. They abandoned the cities and once again worked the land. They studied the habits of the Hobbits in an effort to really enjoy life, rather than blazing through it. They are content…at least for now.

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Why I Let My Young Children Play Video Games

Why I Let My Young Children Play Video Games

I’m sure by now we’ve all seen articles about how bad television is for children. Some go as far as to suggest getting rid of the TV completely, while others say tube time should be limited to 30 minutes. But that is just ridiculous! It would take those poor children three days to watch any Disney movie. And by time you get to the last third of the movie, Bobby and Sue will have forgotten what happened at the beginning and so you’ll have to start all over. Will Sleeping Beauty ever wake up? Does Hiro avenge his brother? Will Po finally learn the power of Chi and save the pandas?! We may never know, but hey, at least we stuck to that 30-minute limit.

Even worse than the parenting sin of letting your child watch too much TV is letting them…du-du-dum…play video games! GASP!!! The thing is, yes, some video games are unsuitable for small children. Much in the way I’m sure you wouldn’t let your four-year-old watch Terminator (even though it is an awesome movie), Call of Duty should likewise be off limits. When we choose age-appropriate games they actually help our children.

My six and four-year-old play games like Sonic and Rayman together. I do limit the time they get to play, but I’m glad it’s an activity they like. I can hear the complaints flooding in now: They’re too young. They’ll get addicted. It’s melting their little brains! Au contraire!

4 reasons why I let them play:

  • Playing games keeps their minds much more active than simply vegging out watching TV.
  • It encourages their imaginations! The worlds and art in these games stimulate their minds, which encourages innovation and creativity.
  • GO TEAM! Playing together inspires teamwork. When one falls behind, the other must go back and help. If there is a difficult part, they help each other.
  • It builds problem solving skills. Not only must new levels be reached, but often the path that leads to the new level is full of puzzles and steps that have to be done just right.

These are my reasons, though there are many more. For some interesting research on the topic check out these TED links!

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ted+talks+video+games&&view=detail&mid=6D53F5FCBB49022A3F5C6D53F5FCBB49022A3F5C&FORM=VRDGAR

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ted+talks+video+games&qpvt=ted+talks+video+games&view=detail&mid=25B3768318F9F68C5A1925B3768318F9F68C5A19&FORM=VRDGAR

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ted+talks+video+games&qpvt=ted+talks+video+games&view=detail&mid=49E2404B57DD1D3CFF3549E2404B57DD1D3CFF35&FORM=VRDGAR

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ted+talks+video+games&qpvt=ted+talks+video+games&view=detail&mid=D91F0969A62ADE94C2F1D91F0969A62ADE94C2F1&FORM=VRDGAR